Boeing’s Blunder: Inspectors of the Boeing 737 MAX were Reportedly Unprepared

Dave Pflieger explains whether or not the Boeing 737 MAX’s were improperly inspected.

Advertisements

According to the U.S. Senate Commerce Committee chairman, an investigation has been launched to evaluate the training of aviation safety inspectors. The inquiry was prompted by claims from whistleblowers that the inspectors were improperly trained, suggesting that some of the inspectors should not have received their certifications. Inspectors responsible for evaluating the Boeing 737 MAX, which has been grounded, have also become a target of this investigation.
The committee started taking whistleblower complaints seriously after the second Boeing 737 MAX crash within a year. The first aircraft crashed in Indonesia this past October, and the second crash occurred in Ethiopia just last month. Together, almost 350 people were killed in the two crashes.
Roger Wicker, a Republican senator, submitted a letter to the Federal Aviation Administration, which suggested the organization had early knowledge of the training discrepancies. He wrote that the FAA had received the whistleblower complaints prior to the crash in Indonesia. Concerns over the training and certification of inspectors were raised as early as August of last year.
The letter sent by Senator Wicker didn’t specify who was responsible for employing the inspectors in question. Typically, the FAA is responsible for training and certifying its own inspectors. However, the organization has started outsourcing these responsibilities to Boeing and other aircraft manufacturers. The concern is that the aircraft manufacturers aren’t putting their inspectors through the same rigorous training programs as those used by the FAA.
The letter written by the senator asked a series of questions, which Daniel Elwell, the organization’s administrator, must answer. Previously, the FAA administrator told the senate committee that he welcomed any outside evaluation of the organization’s processes and methods. Although Elwell also said he’s proud of the FAA’s whistleblower program, he stated that he wasn’t aware of any complaints made by employees of the organization.
According to Mr. Wicker, the Flight Standardization Board responsible for evaluating the Boeing 737 MAX was comprised of improperly trained inspectors. The whistleblower reports suggested these inspectors were incapable of determining the required pilot rating, recommending training programs, or ensuring the flight crew was competent to operate the craft.
Last week, Boeing announced plans to reprogram software aboard the 737 MAX. They believe a glitch in the software’s anti-stall system was being triggered by erroneous data collected by the program. The errors in the software may be responsible for the two crashes this year.

Boeing Has Recently Been Hacked

David Pflieger sheds some light on the recent Boeing hack.

The popular airline manufacturer Boeing has recently been hacked with malware that took out some of its automated manufacturing tools. The infected units are said to have been exclusive to plants in North Charleston, South Carolina. The tools were used as part of an assembly line that produces both a 787 Dreamliner model as well as a wing manufacturing assembly line. Here is a basic overview of the situation.

What Is Malware?

Malware is, in essence, malicious software. The sole function of malware is to infect a program and cause harm. Malware has no beneficial purposes and is designed by those who have a variety of ill intents. This can include but is not limited to:

  • Infecting Computers With Viruses
  • Installing Spyware
  • Installing Ransomware
  • Worms

All of these malware types can potentially damage a computer beyond repair. The motives of malware creators vary but usually involve seeking money in return for removing the malware.

What Is Being Done To Stop Future Attacks?

Boeing has stated that their cyber security team is ever vigilant about the possibility of cyber attacks. The team was able to quickly spot the intrusion and disable it before it was allowed to infect other areas of the business. Thousands of other expanding businesses are also beefing up their cyber security divisions to better protect all types of sensitive information.

Are These Hacks Becoming More Common?

Unfortunately, as technology improves, so does the technology at the disposal of cyber criminals. The number of malware attacks each year is on the rise. In fact, over 9 billion recorded malware attacks occurred on businesses and private citizens in 2017 alone. As these types of attacks continue, the defense against them will have to improve as well.

Businesses all over the world are facing hacking attempts each and every day. These companies will have to be more diligent about either hiring employees or outsourcing other businesses to better protect their own information as well as the sensitive information of consumers.

An Overview of Air Pacific

posted at http://www.liquidinternets.com/wildcatsrugby/images/AirPacificLogo.jpg

Founded in 1951 by renowned aviator, navigator, and inventor Harold George Gatty, Fiji’s international airline Air Pacific has been going strong ever since. Currently run by Managing Director and Chief Executive Officer David Pflieger, Air Pacific flies more than 400 flights every week to 10 countries across the globe, carrying a total of over one million passengers a year. The airline has more than 800 employees, making it a major employer in Fiji.

A longtime member of the airline industry, CEO David Pflieger understands the importance of how the world connects through air travel. The Air Pacific fleet includes Boeing 747, 767, 737, ATR-42 and DHC6 Twin Otter planes that fly to Hong Kong, Australia, the United States, New Zealand, Samoa, Tonga, and more.

Air Pacific provides passengers both business and economy class, respectively dubbed Tabua Class and Pacific Voyager. Tabua Class offers a three-course meal and a wide selection of wines and liqueurs in addition to individual screens with 21 channels to choose from. Pacific Voyager presents a relaxed and friendly environment for the economy traveler, including in-flight entertainment and snacks inspired by South Pacific cuisine.