The Most Commonly Connected Airports in the World

David Pflieger highlights the most commonly connected airports in the world.

While it is easier to get a direct flight than ever before, there is still a very good chance that you will have a layover the next time you fly. This is especially true if you are flying out of a relatively small city. This is done because airlines need to consolidate passengers onto one flight to a major connected airport in order to save money. These are four of the most commonly connected airports in the world.

Chicago O’Haire

O’Haire International Airport deals with more flight connections than any other airport in the world. Chicago is the perfect location for a connected airport because it is centrally located in the country. Airlines throughout the country can divert their passengers to Chicago without having to spent a lot of money on fuel. While there are dozens of airlines operating out of Chicago O’Haire, American and United handle the most flights at the busy airport.

London Heathrow

If you are flying from the United States to Europe, then there is a very good chance that you will have to catch a connecting flight at Heathrow Airport in London. In addition to being the busiest airport in the world, London Heathrow is also the closest major European airport to the United States. Passengers heading overseas make a quick pit stop in London before catching a short flight to their final destination.

Dallas-Fort Worth

It is far easier for airlines to keep costs low if they operate out of a single hub city. They can transfer all of the passengers in small cities to the hub city before dropping them off at their final destination. This operating strategy is a major reason why you are likely to experience a layover at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport at some point during your travels. This popular airport serves as the primary hub city for American Airlines.

Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta

Delta Air Lines uses the same hub city strategy out of Hartsfield-Jackson Airport in Atlanta. Passengers flying to or from a small city on the East Coast of the United States will get rerouted to Atlanta at the start of their trip. The Atlanta airport handled more than 107 million passengers last year, and 73 percent of them were on flights operated by Delta.

Some Airports Allow for Non-Passengers to Pass Through Security

David Pflieger highlights how certain airports are allowing for non-traveling passengers to pass through security checkpoints to send off friends/family.

Since the tragic events of September 11th, 2001, airports have had their gates in a vice grip. It seems like security checkpoints update their strict rules and regulations every other week. This makes travel—especially international travel—a rather difficult hassle. What is safe to go through the security checkpoint in one country is strictly banned in another. For example, in America you can have loose change in your carry on bag or purse without an issue. However, if you arrive in China with coins in your purse, you will need to fish out every last one.

These little discrepancies consume time and energy for travelers, but place an exceptional burden on security guards. This is part of why certain airports in the USA have decided to allow for non-passengers to go through security checkpoints.

Whether a non-passenger wants to see a loved one off before they leave to go abroad, or they simply want to eat at the only Potbelly’s in the state, three airports in the States have decided to open their doors to non-passengers. This is incredible news for those who want to be near those they care about when they can’t necessarily afford to buy an extraneous—or even refundable—airline ticket.

While these patrons are waived the hustle of going through the traditional security gate, they are still vetted through a specialized security system that will likely become more sophisticated as the trend spreads throughout the world. At the Pittsburgh airport for example, non-passengers check in at the specific non-departures level of the airport. Their information is then run against a secure “no fly” list, to ensure the security of everyone in the area. Then non-passengers are granted a stamp which allows them access to the areas beyond the security gates. The Seattle and Tampa airports have implemented a similar protocol.

To read the full article, written by David Pflieger, make sure to click the link.

Airline Apocalypse: Failed and Defunct Airlines

Dave Pflieger highlights a few once-popular airlines that have gone the way of the dodo.

Commercial aviation may be barely a century old, but few would argue that it’s going anywhere anytime soon. Flight is still the most efficient way to travel, and it’s shaped the way we interact with the world in truly dramatic ways. But just because air travel is here for the long haul doesn’t mean that there aren’t casualties along the way. Here are some once famous airlines that have failed to stay with us over the years.

Eastern Air Lines

Miami-based Eastern Air Lines was once one of the biggest players in commercial air, but it became a lesson in the powerful role workers can play in a company’s feasibility. The first cause for concern came in 1988, as more economical alternatives started to cut into Eastern’s bottom line, but it was the deregulation in the years that followed which served as the nail in the coffin. An attempt to freeze out protesting members of the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers led to a galvanization of multiple related unions, and Eastern Air Lines was left crippled. They were forced to declare bankruptcy in 1989 and finally ended operations at the beginning of 1991.

Braniff International Airlines

Few airlines had the flair that Braniff International did. Their colorful uniforms, designed by Emilio Pucci, especially made them stand apart from the competition. But it was the company’s notable confidence that got the best of it. An attempt at aggressive expansion in a time when fuel costs peaked and economy alternatives created a highly competitive market drove Braniff into deep debt and rapidly led to their dissolution.

Lakers Airways Skytrain

The problem with Lakers was in many ways the polar opposite of Braniff. They entered the market during the glut of new competitors in the early 1980s and promised tremendously low cost flights, often as much as half that of the major airlines. Unfortunately, the model quickly proved unsustainable, and they ended up as just another forgotten experiment in a boom notable for them.

Interflug

It could be argued that Interflug was a victim of geopolitics, but there had been problems with its structure for a long time. Based out of East Berlin, its planes suffered from poor fuel efficiency and noise protection. When the Berlin wall fell, a number of airlines expressed interest in purchasing Interflug, but the airline ultimately failed to find a serious buyer.

Dave Pflieger | What To Do If Your Flight Is Delayed

Dave Pflieger highlights exactly what you should do if your flight is delayed.

Dave Pflieger, aviation professional with decades of experience, explains what you should do if your flight is delayed.

Here is an excerpt:

“A flight delay or cancellation is any traveler’s worst nightmare, however that doesn’t mean that a bit of preparation isn’t going to come in handy in order to tackle these difficulties and overcome them. Knowing rules and regulations may come in handy in order to take full advantage of the situation.
Know your rights
Depending on the airlines, different rules may be in places once a flight is canceled or delayed. Free re-bookings or refunds may come into place, along with being places on a similar flight with another airline – anything to make a customer satisfied, after all. Check the fine print to make sure what the rules are so you can be ready if the time comes.

Bought the flight with a credit card?
This isn’t a well-known fact, but buying airfare with a credit card may entitle the buyer to many protections, such as receiving compensation for a delay, or special rules that kick in once a flight is interrupted. Make sure to keep all documents on-hand in order for the process to be as quick and easy as possible.”

To read the full article, written by Dave Pflieger, click here.