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Golf 101 – Hitting a Fairway Wood

 Fairway Wood pic
Fairway Wood
Image: golftips.golfweek.com

David “Dave” Pflieger is an airline executive with a history of successful turnarounds and restructuring campaigns. Outside of his professional pursuits, David Pflieger enjoys golfing.

In the game of golf, hitting a fairway wood requires a great deal of patience and control. Players often attempt to sweep the ball up off the fairway, resulting in poor contact between the ball and club. Most teachers recommend positioning the ball slightly forward of your stance, allowing you to hit down on the ball. When the fairway wood bottoms out at the right position, the natural loft of the club will lift it off the ground as intended.

Just like driving off of a tee, hitting a fairway wood requires a smooth swing to avoid losing control of the club. While it may seem like you need to hack away at the ball to achieve the proper loft, this extra strength can actually result in more mishits. With enough practice, you will learn how fast you can swing the fairway wood without losing control.

Reporting Greenhouse Gas Emissions Cuts Airline’s Carbon Emissions

Virgin America pic
Climate Registry
Image: theclimateregistry.org

As President & CEO of Ravn Air Group in Alaska, David “Dave” Pflieger has held executive positions at seven different airlines including Delta Air Lines, Song, Virgin America, Fiji Airways, Silver Airways, and Larry Ellison’s Hawaii Island Air.

During his tenure at Virgin America, David Pflieger led the company to become the first airline in the U.S. to register its greenhouse gas emissions. More specifically, Virgin America was the first airline in the country to report its third-party verified carbon footprint in accordance with the globally accepted standards of The Climate Registry in 2008. The greenhouse gas emissions reported represented the environmental emissions from the entire Virgin America organization, including flight, ground, and corporate operations. The data was gathered with the help of the EPA to identify the sources of emissions, devise ways to reduce emissions, and track progress.

This practice of reporting greenhouse gas emissions helped the airline track and significantly reduce its greenhouse gas footprint. Notably, in its first year of reporting, Virgin America’s organization-wide carbon emissions per 1,000 seat miles were 166.24 metric tons.

Six years later in 2014, the organizations’ carbon emissions per 1,000 seat miles were down to 133.80 metric tons.
In addition, once the company realized that older fleets were neither fuel efficient nor good for the environment — due to high carbon emissions— it made a huge investment in new aircraft and a younger fleet.

As a result of that decision, Virgin now has one of the country’s youngest fleets, which consumes, on average, 15 percent less fuel and has 15% lower GHGs than other domestic U.S. fleets.