Dave Pflieger | What To Do If Your Flight Is Delayed

Dave Pflieger highlights exactly what you should do if your flight is delayed.

Advertisements

Dave Pflieger, aviation professional with decades of experience, explains what you should do if your flight is delayed.

Here is an excerpt:

“A flight delay or cancellation is any traveler’s worst nightmare, however that doesn’t mean that a bit of preparation isn’t going to come in handy in order to tackle these difficulties and overcome them. Knowing rules and regulations may come in handy in order to take full advantage of the situation.
Know your rights
Depending on the airlines, different rules may be in places once a flight is canceled or delayed. Free re-bookings or refunds may come into place, along with being places on a similar flight with another airline – anything to make a customer satisfied, after all. Check the fine print to make sure what the rules are so you can be ready if the time comes.

Bought the flight with a credit card?
This isn’t a well-known fact, but buying airfare with a credit card may entitle the buyer to many protections, such as receiving compensation for a delay, or special rules that kick in once a flight is interrupted. Make sure to keep all documents on-hand in order for the process to be as quick and easy as possible.”

To read the full article, written by Dave Pflieger, click here.

Dave Pflieger Featured In IdeaMensch

Dave Pflieger was recently featured in IdeaMensch.

Dave Pflieger, CEO of Ravn Alaska and entrepreneur, was recently featured in IdeaMensch. The website is well-known for its interviews with successful entrepreneurs. These interviews look to share wisdom and insight to future entrepreneurs.

Here is an excerpt:

Where did the idea for Virgin America come from?
The idea for Virgin America originated from the world-famous British billionaire, Richard Branson, who wanted to introduce his “Virgin” brand to the United States marketplace. Branson wanted a new, low-cost, high-frills airline in the United States.

What does your typical day look like and how do you make it productive?
A typical day in both startups and turnarounds is pretty much like a firefighter parachuting into a forest fire and putting out fires; as I like to tell my team, it’s both a sprint and a marathon to either start a company or turn one around. Firstly, you have to put together a great team; secondly, you have to focus on the basics of whatever your business is all about; thirdly, you have to focus on the harder stuff (infrastructure, longer term stuff). The challenging part is that you have to do this all simultaneously, and you have to do them well.

To read the entire interview with Dave Pflieger, click the link!

Boeing Has Recently Been Hacked

David Pflieger sheds some light on the recent Boeing hack.

The popular airline manufacturer Boeing has recently been hacked with malware that took out some of its automated manufacturing tools. The infected units are said to have been exclusive to plants in North Charleston, South Carolina. The tools were used as part of an assembly line that produces both a 787 Dreamliner model as well as a wing manufacturing assembly line. Here is a basic overview of the situation.

What Is Malware?

Malware is, in essence, malicious software. The sole function of malware is to infect a program and cause harm. Malware has no beneficial purposes and is designed by those who have a variety of ill intents. This can include but is not limited to:

  • Infecting Computers With Viruses
  • Installing Spyware
  • Installing Ransomware
  • Worms

All of these malware types can potentially damage a computer beyond repair. The motives of malware creators vary but usually involve seeking money in return for removing the malware.

What Is Being Done To Stop Future Attacks?

Boeing has stated that their cyber security team is ever vigilant about the possibility of cyber attacks. The team was able to quickly spot the intrusion and disable it before it was allowed to infect other areas of the business. Thousands of other expanding businesses are also beefing up their cyber security divisions to better protect all types of sensitive information.

Are These Hacks Becoming More Common?

Unfortunately, as technology improves, so does the technology at the disposal of cyber criminals. The number of malware attacks each year is on the rise. In fact, over 9 billion recorded malware attacks occurred on businesses and private citizens in 2017 alone. As these types of attacks continue, the defense against them will have to improve as well.

Businesses all over the world are facing hacking attempts each and every day. These companies will have to be more diligent about either hiring employees or outsourcing other businesses to better protect their own information as well as the sensitive information of consumers.

Three Women That Changed Aviation Forever

David Pflieger highlights several female aviators throughout history.

Women have been flying since 1908, but it wasn’t until the 1970s that they were able to have the same cockpit access as their male counterparts. These three women made particularly significant contributions to the world of aviation and space exploration.

Amelia Earhart

Perhaps the most well-known female pilot in history, Amelia Earhart was the first woman to fly nonstop across the Atlantic Ocean. On August 25, 1932, she also became the first woman to fly nonstop across the United States, with a flight that took her from Los Angeles to Newark, New Jersey.

In addition to her aviation success, Earhart was a clothing designer, vice president of the National Aeronautic Association, and a visiting professor at Purdue University. In 1937, Earhart attempted to fly across the world, but it is believed that her plane crashed into the Pacific Ocean. Her remains have never been found, and her disappearance remains a great mystery.

Harriet Quimby

Although her aviation career was short, Harriet Quimby paved the way for female pilots by becoming the first woman to earn a pilot’s license. After receiving her Federation Aeronautique Internationale certificate in August 1911, she joined an exhibition team called the Moisant International Aviators. Shortly after, she became the first woman to fly across Mexico City.

In April 1912, she became the first woman to fly solo across the English Channel. Upon returning to the United States, Quimby performed at the Harvard-Boston Aviation Meet on July 1, 1912. During her flight, Quimby and her co-pilot, William Willard, fell to their deaths in Dorchester Harbor after their plane flipped over, ejecting both of them.

Bessie Coleman

The first African American to receive a pilot’s license, Bessie Coleman was determined to succeed in the aviation world, despite her race and gender. After attempting to earn her license in the United States, Coleman went to France where she earned her license from the Federation Aeronautique Internationale on June 15, 1921.

After earning her license, Coleman began performing throughout the United States, including Chicago and southern states. Her ultimate goal of opening a flying school for African Americans was nearly realized, but a crash during a test flight at the May Day celebration in Jacksonville, Florida on April 30, 1926 ended her life.